About Me & Others User Guide

Table of Contents


How-to: Explore Your “Dots” Tab

The “dots” tab consists of a live feed of all your dots (given and received) and, if enabled for your group or organization, a histogram view that organizes your dots into categories specified by your group or organization’s ontology. 

Your Dots Feed

By default, your dots feed will show the dots you have received organized chronologically with your most recent dots appearing first. You can also see the dots you have given by using the toggle in the upper right hand corner. Both your dots given and received can be organized into specific views by using filters. 

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You can choose from the following four filters:

  • Dot Events: This is your default view, sorted by dot creation date (newest to oldest). Note that a “dot event” refers to when a user selects one or more attributes (with associated ratings) submitted together with an optional comment. 
  • Dots by Attribute: This filter groups all dots a user has given/received by attribute, showing the number of positive and negative dots for each and indicating with color and icon if the overall sentiment for that attribute is positive or negative. The list is sorted by dot count with the attribute with the most number of dots appearing at the top. 
  • Dots by People: This filter groups all dots a user has given/received by person (author if viewing dots received and subject is viewing dots given) showing the number of positive and negative dots for each and indicating with color and icon if the overall sentiment for that person is positive or negative. The list is sorted by dot count with the person with the most number of dots appearing at the top. Clicking into a subject or an author row allows you to review all the dots you gave to/received from them through time. 
  • Dots by Meeting: This filter groups all dots by the meeting in which a user has given or received dots. The list is sorted by the count of dots the user has given or received in that meeting. Click into any meeting to see all the dots a user has given or received during that meeting.

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Histogram View

This is a configurable view that may or may not be available to you depending on your group or organizations’ settings. 

The histogram view organizes your dots into categories specified by your group or organization’s ontology. Each bar represents the aggregate score of all dots received in that category. Note that if “believability” is being used in your group or organization, you will see two bars for each category (one bar will represent the aggregate score of all dots received in that category, while the other will represent the “believability-weighted” aggregate).

While the initial view is at the category level, you can click into a bar or category to drill in, i.e., see aggregates by attributes in that category. 

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How-to: Explore Your “Summary” Tab

The “summary” tab consists of a variety of “tiles” that draw out insights from the dots you have given and received, including an emerging picture of your strengths and weaknesses and your dotting tendencies. Depending on your group or organizations’ settings, you may have all or a subset of the below tiles available to you. 

Note that on mobile, this information is the same, but is organized differently. In your About Me tab in Mobile Dot Collector, there are three sections: Picture of you, Interactions, and Behaviors. Interactions is where you will find the information on who dots you, what you’re dotted on, who you dot, what you dot others on, and what you ignore.  

Picture of You

The “Picture of You” tile displays an evolving picture of your strengths and weaknesses based on the feedback you have received. 

A “strength” is an attribute where your entire “confidence band” falls above 7. A “weakness” is one where the entire band falls below 6.0. Rather than show a discrete number, which may or may not be precisely accurate, confidence bands are intended to show the range of scores that we’re confident you fall into based on the data we have. The wider they are, the less confident we are of your precise score. Many people often wonder why they have strengths, but very few weaknesses. This is because based on people’s dotting behavior over timepeople tend to give a much higher proportion of positive dots to negativeit’s much less likely that your confidence band will fall entirely below 6.0.

 

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Click on the “Picture of You” tile (or on “View Full Picture”) to see details behind your strengths and weaknesses summary. You can use the following filters to explore different perspectives on the data:

  • View (by stream, by confidence, by impact)
    • By Stream: See aggregate scores organized by attribute broken down by data streams (i.e., dots, ranks, and tests), as well as an “Overall Score” and where applicable, a believability score. 

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    • By Confidence: See attributes ordered by highest to lowest confidence, which is a measure of our system’s accuracy and precision in the “Overall Score.” Note that confidence and your overall score on an attribute are different measures. As such, your attribute with highest confidence may or may not also represent a strength or a weakness. Attributes that are strengths or weaknesses are indicated by a colored band, whereas the rest will be greyed out. Attributes we don't know enough about (i.e., have very low confidence data on) will be at the bottom of the list and will not display an associated confidence band. 


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    • By Impact: A bar extending to the right (in the positive direction) suggests an attribute score that is more positive than the average score for that attribute across your group or organization. A bar extending to the left (in the negative direction) suggests an attribute score that is more negative than the average score for that attribute across your group or organization. The length of the bar indicates the magnitude of this insight. 

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  • Score (absolute or percentile)
  • Filter (all attributes or strengths and weaknesses)

By default, your filters will be set to show absolute score for all attributes by stream (e.g., dots, ranks). Confidence bands are indicated in brackets underneath each “Overall Score.” An overall score is a statistical average of all available data for an attribute. Principles uses heuristic and statistical algorithms to produce a best estimate, which improves with more and diverse data (meaning data from multiple sources such as dots, rankings, and/or personality assessments). The wider the confidence band is, the less confident our systems are in calculating a precise score for that attribute. As an example, when a band stretches from one end of the scale to the other, the overall score will be displayed as a 5 (i.e. the middle of the band). When this is the case, there is just very little information and the value may easily be an 8 or a 3. More data is often required to produce a meaningful estimate.

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Clicking on an attribute allows you to see additional insights. Toggle from Summary to Details to see the associated dots. The attributes in this view are organized into “roll-up” and associated “child” attributes.The scores for “roll-ups” reflect all of the dots given directly on the “roll-up” attribute itself as well as on any of the associated “child” attributes. “Roll-up” attributes are indicated with a folder icon next to them. 

 

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Once you have clicked on an “roll-up” or “child” attribute, you will find the following insights: 

  • Attribute Summary Distribution: See how an individual’s score on an attribute falls relative to the distribution of scores across the group or organization. The shaded box reflects the confidence band for the individual score, while the line graph represents the distribution of scores across the population. 

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  • Top Contributors: See the people who contribute most significantly to the individual’s picture on a percentage basis. Note that only authors who have contributed a minimum number of dots and/or rankings will be considered.

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  • Top 10”: Depending on your group or organizations settings, you may or may not have this feature available to you. The “Top 10” highlights people with the highest “Overall Scores” on a chosen attribute. People with high scores that are high confidence are placed at the top whereas people with low scores that are high confidence are placed at the bottom. The people with mid-level or low confidence scores are placed in between. People we don't know enough about (i.e., have very low confidence data on) aren't considered at all. 

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How-to: Explore “Who Dots You”

The “Who Dots You” tile summarizes the people who dot you most frequently and how many of those dots are positive or negative.

 

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The list is organized by the total number of dots you have received in descending order. The list will begin populating once you have received a minimum of 10 dots (irrespective of whether those dots are from the same person or multiple people). You need to have received a minimum of 3 dots from someone for them to appear on this list. If a user has a “bias” toward you, an icon will be displayed next to their name. Note that a bias can be positive or negative, and is identified when a user dots a particular subject disproportionately favorably or unfavorably when compared to their overall dotting tendencies, and the rest of the population dots this subject disproportionately in the opposite direction as this user.

 

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You can click on a person in this list for a detailed breakdown of how that person dots you and how their perspective of you compares to their perspective of others. 

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How-to: Explore “What You Are Dotted On”

The “What You Are Dotted On” tile summarizes the attributes you are most frequently dotted on and how many of those dots are positive or negative.

 

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The list is organized by the total number of dots you have received on an attribute in descending order. The list will begin populating once you have received a minimum of 10 dots (irrespective of whether those dots are on the same or different attributes). You need to have received a minimum of 3 dots on an attribute for that attribute to appear on this list. If a user has a “bias” toward an attribute, an icon will be shown next to it. Note that a bias can be positive or negative, and is identified when a user dots on a particular attribute disproportionately favorably or unfavorably when compared to their overall dotting tendencies.

 

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You can click on any attribute in the list to see how you compare to others on that attribute. The chart in the top left shows the distribution of dots on that attribute & how you fit in that scale (the shaded box). In this case, you are dotted more negatively on the attribute “Assertive and Open-Minded at the same time” relative to your peers. 

 

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How-to: Explore “Who You Dot”

The “Who You Dot” tile summarizes the people you have dotted most frequently and how many of those dots are positive or negative. 

 

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The list is organized by the total number of dots you have given in descending order. The list will begin populating once you have given a minimum of 10 dots (irrespective of whether those dots are given to the same person or multiple people). You need to have given a minimum of 3 dots to someone for them to appear on this list. If a user has a “bias” towards a particular subject, an icon will be displayed next to their name. Note that a bias can be positive or negative, and is identified when a user dots a particular subject disproportionately favorably or unfavorably when compared to their overall dotting tendencies, and the rest of the population dots this subject disproportionately in the opposite direction as this user.

 

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You can click on a person in this list to see how your perspective of them compares to your perspective of other people. In this case, you can see that Larry has similar observations of Minoo than he has of others. When you look at the distribution of dots (top distribution), you can see the distribution of how Larry dots everyone & how Minoo fits in that scale (the shaded box). Then, when you look at the graph below, you can look at how everyone else dots Minoo, which is about the same. As such, relative to population, Larry dots Minoo similarly. 

 

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How-to: Explore “What You Dot”

The “What You Dot” tile summarizes the attributes you dot on the most and how many of those dots are positive or negative.

 

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The list is organized by the total number of dots you have given on an attribute in descending order. The list will begin populating once you have given a minimum of 10 dots (irrespective of whether those dots are given on the same or different attributes). You need to have given a minimum of 3 dots on an attribute for that attribute to appear on this list. If a user has a “bias” toward an attribute, an icon will be shown next to it. Note that a bias can be positive or negative, and is identified when a user dots on a particular attribute disproportionately favorably or unfavorably when compared to their overall dotting tendencies.

 

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You can click on an attribute in this list to see how you dot on that attribute relative to how you dot others on that attribute. 

How-to: Explore “What You Ignore”

The “What You Ignore” tile summarizes the attributes you rarely give feedback on.

How-to: Explore “Behaviors”

The “Behaviors” tile summarizes the way you dot - are your dots mostly positive or negative? How does your mix compare to how others dot? 

 

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You can click on the “Behaviors” tile to see details on how your dotting behavior compares to the rest of the population. Note that you have to have given a minimum of 3 dots to a minimum of 3 recipients in order for this view to be displayed. 

 

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